Monthly Archive: August 2011

Aug 25 2011

Testimonial: Aetrex Footbeds

The pressure map of my footprint, key to Aetrex' iStep program for determing a the best footbed for my (your) feet.

Like skinning, today’s run was a pleasant reminder of how much I love trail running. It’s a big part of why I’m rather inclined to like the earning part of backcountry skiing, for that steady state aerobically induced runners high. There was a time, not so far back, when both activities were in jeopardy. I …

Keep making backcountry turns

Aug 20 2011

Review: Rottefella’s NTN Freeride

It has more range of motion than standard cable bindings, but limits out at 30+.

It’s been five years now that NTN has been available – four if you only count the retail seasons. In that time it has managed to develop a small but enthusiastic band of converts that is growing steadily. When first introduced to the media in January 2007, it was a rather impressive system. Though a …

Keep making backcountry turns

Aug 16 2011

Review: BD introduces O1 telemark binding

The One - as announced: Weight - 3 lbs., 10 oz. (1.67 kg) MSRP: $299

This is a rerun of an article originally published on Couloir Online 22dec05 (Revised 20apr06). It is reposted here as a historical reference and basis of comparison for future revisions to the O1. Couloir began prodding telemark binding manufacturers back in 2001 to “expand their horizons from merely binding the boot to the ski, to …

Keep making backcountry turns

Aug 12 2011

Skin Track Angles – A Classic Debate

Heading up to Campion Peak in the Selkirk Range, BC, Canada.

It’s been quite awhile since first publishing the classic debate on what is the best angle of attack to take when skinning up a mountain. A lot of that comes down to terrain and personal preferences, but everyone I know tends to prefer either a low or high angle skin track. The basic tenets of …

Keep making backcountry turns

Aug 12 2011

Skinning: Keeper Steeper

Reprinted from Couloir XIII-4, Winter 2001

Might I be so bold as to suggest that the esteemed skier from Truckee, Mr. Dostie, is suffering from a cranial/rectal impaction when it comes to appreciating the fine art of steep skinning? Not only is steep skinning faster and more efficient, it is The Way. The Chosen Path. The Trail to Enlightenment as well …

Keep making backcountry turns

Aug 12 2011

Skinning: Tracks of the Tortoise

It's an age old debate. What's better, the low angle or steep skin track? Read on.

Taking the low road has several advantages. It is unquestionably more efficient…is consistently safer, arguably more aesthetic and, for those still intent on a challenge, is more difficult to achieve with purity…

Older posts «