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Mar 07 2017

Review: G3 FINDr 86/94/102

Skis are a funny business. They are a combination of what one might consider mere mechanical construction, yet they are also part art. A portion of that is certainly due to the delight we experience when shussing through the snow, but the real magic is how ski designers can take what are essentially a common set of ingredients and combine them in such a way that every design is unique, like songs that rely on the same notes, but are infinitely variable. And the song some skis sing is magical.

FINDr skis from G3 in three widths: 86, 94, 102 mm.

FINDr skis from G3 in three widths: 86, 94, 102 mm.


G3’s FINDr is one of those skis that starts out steady and solid, gaining your confidence before you dare to turn ‘em loose. When you do, they fairly leap into action, goading you along with a playful pop at the end of each turn that has the net effect of encouraging you to rev the engine and give ‘er a little more gas.

The ingredients to this ski give some insight to its performance. Depending on the width you prefer, this is a solid tool you can rely on, frontside or backcountry. A traditional camber yields a solid, reliable feel in a variety of conditions, with a sweet flex that delivers round turns. Edgehold is solid and, thanks to PU reinforced sidewalls, damp, remarkably so considering how light this ski is. Yes, there’s a bit of carbon in the FINDr forumula, but not so it dominates the skiing sensation, it just contributes to the touring performance. It isn’t rando lite, also known as chatter-lite, but not a tank either. It’s light enough for multi-lap days, but still has enough meat on the bones, thanks to a Paulonia wood core, to be able to bust some crud with confidence.

The early rise tip is nice for deep days and breaking trail. There’s a short rounded tail that lets the ski release easily from turn to turn in deep snow, but the traditional camber maintains some snap on firm snow.

Tele skiers can rejoice that G3 added a titanal mounting plate so there’s something for your free heel binding to hold on to while it tries to pry itself loose.

It’s a good, reliable, overall combination of features. If you’re in the market for new boards, be sure to give these a try before you buy. I only tested the FINDr 94 but it is also available in 86 mm and 102mm wide versions. Most of you will prefer the wider version. While I can’t say with certainty they ski the same, I’m confident they’re similar enough to be consider equivalent.

Genuine Guide Gear

FINDr 94
MSRP: $780
Dimensions: 126-94-113
Radius: 18-22M

Length (cm)
167
172
177
182
187
Weight (single)
1.37 kg
1.41 kg
1.45 kg
1.49 kg
1.56 kg
Weight (single)
3 lb.
3 lb., 2 oz.
3 lb., 3 oz.
3 lb., 5 oz.
3 lb., 7 oz.

FINDr 102
MSRP: $800
Dimensions: 133-102-120
Radius: 21-25M

Length (cm)
174
179
184
189
Weight (single)
1.48 kg
1.52 kg
1.56 kg
1.61 kg
Weight (single)
3 lb., 4 oz.
3 lb., 6 oz.
3 lb., 7 oz.
3 lb., 9 oz.

FINDr 86
MSRP: $760
Dimensions: 122-86-109
Radius: 16-19M

Length (cm)
162
167
172
177
182
Weight (single)
1.23 kg
1.27 kg
1.31 kg
1.35 kg
1.39 kg
Weight (single)
2 lb.,11 oz
2lb13oz
2lb14oz
3 lb.
3 lb., 1 oz.

© 2017
 


  • PHam

    I’m not sure if it is true, but I had heard the 102 has a different camber/early-rise/flex profile than the 86 and 94. I realize you only tried the 94, but perhaps G3 or others can confirm or reject the difference?

  • PHam

    With the 2-part binding area, is there lots of room for a TTS block? It looks like there is…

  • jnicol

    Saw these in a store and figured you couldn’t mount ‘any’ tele binding to it due to the missing top section in the middle.

  • Dostie

    Good point. It definitely depends on the size boot and particular binding. Poor odds with small feet. Meidjo, Outlaw, Freeride, Switchback et al will probably work, but TTS is a gamble depending on where the cable block is mounted.